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Data Artem : ICI : All Capitals

Building Name Capital Location Subject Faces foldedSearchData
Abbatiale Notre-Dame Portal (?) Prophet Isaiah 3 null Inscription located over the prophet's left shoulder. In 1877, J. de Laurière mentions traces of the Inscription on a scroll carried by the prophet and claims that it is Ecce virgo concipiet (Isaïe, 7,14). No trace is visble today. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 115 null Lauriere (Isaie,
Abbatiale Saint-Sauveur unknown Samson 1 1 This capital is extremely damaged, and is the only one in situ at Saint-Sauveur. The church was destroyed in 1838. Sagittarius is represented on one face, Samson fighting a lion is on another. Only a trace of the inscription is now visible, and hardly any of the sculpted figures. The Benedictine abbey of Saint-Sauveur was cited in the precept of Charles the Fat (887). The remaining sculpture is now housed in the Porte du Croux Museum. Anfray dates this capital to the 12th century. vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 37-38 Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Abbaye de Moutiers-Saint-Jean Unknown Sacrifice of Cain and Abel 1 1 Left side: Tree of life. Main side with inscriptions on the abacus: Cain and Abel. A hand reaches out of the sky towards Abel, who holds a lamb in his arms. On the left, Cain holds a sheaf of wheat. There is a two-headed bird between them. Left side: Samson or David fighting the lion. Now kept in the William Hayes Fogg Art Museum. Cahn, Walter et Linda Seidel (1979). Romanesque Sculpture in American Collections. New England Museums, Vol. I, New York : Burt Franklin & co, p. 128-131. Sanoner G (1921). « Iconographie de la Bible, d'après les artistes de l'antiquité et du moyen âge », Bulletin Monumental, vol. 80, p. 234. null d'apres l'antiquite age », null
Abbaye Saint-Pierre Cloister Christ in Majesty 1 3 Chapter House Capital Left-side of door Rex is the word most frequently used in biblical and liturgical language to designate God or Christ. It is generally used for Christ, as the three letters appear on numerous halos on crucifixions. It is also associated on the cross with the words lex, lux and pax. The capital is attributed to the twelfth century. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 104
Abbaye Saint-Pierre Cloister The elect 1 4 Chapter House Capital of first arcade on the right. Inscription is on the rondel which contains a figure with covered hands. The inscription is dated to the twelfth century. null null
Abbaye Saint-Pierre Narthex Daniel in the Lion's Den 1 2 Capital on left, against west façade The scene of Daniel in the lions' den is one of the most represented biblical episodes (Daniel 6:2-20). Christians view the deliverance of Daniel as a symbol of Resurrection. The scene is represented 39 times in the catacombs in Rome. The liturgy for the dead references Daniel, who is referenced in an ancient commendatio animae (Libera Domine animam servi tui sicut liberasti Danielem de lacu leonum). This capital can be dated to the twelfth century. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 103 facade
Abbaye Saint-Pierre South Portal Christ in Majesty 1 1 At the summit, Christ sits in Majesty, making a gesture of blessing and holding a book. On each side of Christ, at the same height as his knees, are two bas-reliefs of angels. At the feet of the angels are two reliefs that depict St. Peter, on Christ's right, and St. Paul, at Christ's left. Dates c. 12th century vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 102
Albussac Choir Possible mention of work and signature. 1 1 Capital north of entrance to choir, approx. 3m from ground. On the impost and continues at top of west face. The term ecclesia aeterna does not appear in the Bible. This appears to be a liturgical inspiration. The inscription may be dated to the first half of the 11th century. Vol. 4 (II), Limousin: Corrèze, Creuse, Haute-Vienne, 1 Correze,
Ancien Abbaye Saint-Jean-de-Réome Unknown, Daniel in the Lions' Den 1 Saint-Jean-de-Reome) 1 Now housed in Musée archéologique, Dijon References Daniel in the Lions' Den. Figure of Daniel is contained within a protective mandorla. Peter Diemer has noted that the presentation of Daniel within a mandorla signified the protection of the divine. Diemer also noted that it was a decorative choice. Biaiy, 302. For more on the sculptore of Moutiers-Saint-Jean, see Neil Stratford, "La sculpture médiévale de Moutiers-Saint-Jean (Saint-Jean-de-Réome)," Congrès archéologique de France, Côte d'Or, 152 (1992), 157-209. Musee archeologique, medievale (Saint-Jean-de-Reome)," Congres archeologique Cote
Ancienne Abbaye Notre-Dame Crypt name 1 1 Western crypt, south side, capital next to door. Dates to 12th century, period when western part of the crypt was built. Repeated by Michel Joly, the abbot of Bour proposed that this inscription read, frater Benedictus Christo devotus, and Robert Saint-Jean suggested that it read frater Beotidus. Either one of these interpretations of the carved inscription is possible. It appears to be a name inscribed on the impost, but both transcriptions are hypothetics. Marie-Thérèse Morlet suggests the following possibilities, Hariboldus, Hairiboldus, Hairboldus which are close to what is carved on this capital. vol. 16, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Hautes-Alpes, Ardèche, Drôme, 78 Marie-Therese Ardeche, Drome,
Ancienne abbaye Saint-Martin Unknown Samson 1 1 in Museum This episode is found in Judges 14:5-6. vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 38 Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Ancienne abbaye Saint-Martin Unknown faune and figures 1 2 in Museum (ca. 12th c) Monstrous animals are mentioned by Jérémie in his prophecy against Babylon, in which the city is in ruins and deserted: Propterea habitabunt dracones cum faunis ficariis, et habitabunt in ea struthiones, et non inhabitabitur ultra usque in sempiternum (L, 39). vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 40 Jeremie Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Ancienne abbaye Saint-Martin Unknown Ethopian 1 3 in museum Ethiopians were one of the fantastical people written of by medieval authors such as: Isidore of Seville, Raban Maur, and Honorius of Autun. They followed in the tradition of of Pliny. Ethiopians were thought to have two pairs of eyes and to have lived by the seaside. vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 41 Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Ancienne cathédrale Saint-Vincent West Portal Armed angel confronting a demon 1 cathedrale 1 Capital at the right of entry to church Inscription is on the impost of two faces of capital. (Probably 1st quarter 12th century) The inscription does not form a classical verse. There are several errors in the meter and cognatur is incorrect; it should read conatur. vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 115 Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Ancienne église abbatiale Sainte-Geneviève Nave? Biblical scenes: Creation, Original Sin, Expulsion 1 eglise Sainte-Genevieve) 1 Now housed in the Dépôt de l'École nationale supérieure des Beaux Arts ca. 1100-1110 Depot l'Ecole superieure
Ancienne église priorale Nave Profane life, musicians 2 eglise 1 Capital of 2nd pillar of nave, south side, approx. 4 m. high This capital depicts scenes from the profane life: musicians and bears. This type of scene is rarely inscribed. Saint-Pierre-le-Moûtier, a benedictine priory of Saint-Martin d'Autun, was founded in 810. The romanesque church is mentioned in a papal bull of Alexander III confirming its dependencies in 1164. vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 44 Saint-Pierre-le-Moutier, Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Ancienne église priorale Saint-Divitien Choir St. Peter in Chains 3 eglise 1 Scene depicts narrative as described in Acts 7:3-12. Entrance to choir on north side The priory is mentioned for the first time in 1090 as a dependency of the abbey of Bourg-Dieu (Indre). The text is carved on the sides of mandorlas that encircle St. Peter. The word, gressus, is inscribed on the astragale. Vol. 2 Poitou-Charentes and Département de la Vienne (excepté la ville de Poitiers), 132 Departement (excepte
Ancienne église priorale Saint-Divitien Choir Christ in Majesty 1 eglise 2 Christ in Glory Choir, placed at the entrance to the choir, north side The inscription represents the concept of Christ as victor over death, which assures the liberation of man. See article on capitals of Saint-Divitien à Saulgé in the Bulletin Monumentale by M. -Th. Camus. Vol. 2 Poitou-Charentes and Département de la Vienne (excepté la ville de Poitiers), 133 a Saulge Departement (excepte
Ancien prieuré Saint-Eptade Western Portal Identification of an angel Daniel in the Lions' Den 1 prieure 1 Capital left of tympanum, 2.6 m from ground. (dated to Romanesque period) The narrative of Daniel in the Lions' Den (Daniel 6.2-29) is a popular theme in the Middle Ages. It is difficult to date this capital because the inscription is not legible. Jean Dupont thought that the name read: Danihel. vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 27 Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Ancien prieuré Saint-Fortunat Cloister No scene 1 prieure 1 On the impost of a capital in the cloister's east gallery, at the chapter house, the impost of the capital of the 6th arcade turning toward the gallery. Length of epigraphic field = 55,5 cm.; Height of 1st letter = 3 cm. This inscriptions was discovered in 1886 and is considered a commentary that recalls the serious nature that must be maintained in the cloister. It does not date any later than the beginning of the twelfth century. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 62 Puy-de-Dome,
Ancien prieuré Saint-Hilaire Choir decorative, donor signature (dates late 11th-early 12th century) 1 prieure 1 Ambulatory, north side (rond point) It is not possible to identify the donor with certainty. Rondier wrote that the Aimeri II, abbot of Saint-Jean-d'Angély, founded the priory of Saint-Hilaire between 1018 and 1030. Paleographic and architectural analysis prohibit dating the inscription earlier than the late eleventh century. A proposed identification of Aimericus as a donor can be found in two donation charters: one for the Abbey of Saint-Jean-d'Angély, the other for the abbey of Saint-Florent de Saumur, between 1090 et 1100 (Cartulaire de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Jean-d'Angély, éd. G. MUSSET, t. II, Paris/Saintes, 1904, n° 435, p. 99 (Archives historiques Saintonge et Aunis, 33), et Chartes poitevines de l'abbaye de Saint-Florent près Saumur, éd. M. MARCHEGAY, t. II, Poitiers, 1873, n° LXXXIV, p. 122 (Archives historiques Poitou, 2). vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 134 Saint-Jean-d'Angely, Saint-Jean-d'Angely, ed. pres Deux-Sevres,
Ancien prieuré Saint-Martin Choir Christ in chains 1 prieure 1 Capital on large column at the northernmost point of the north transept. A moulage (cast) taken of the capital during the restorations of 1890-91, is in the Musée de la ville. The capital depicts Christ in chains between two soldiers. He is comforted by an angel, while the soldier presents him with a stick as a sceptre. The inscription is inscribed on the upper branch of the cross in his nimbus. The inscription is not visible from the ground, and thus the inscription is not legible. The capital's sculpted imagery has been the subject of art historical analysis, but there is little mention of the accompanying inscription. Vol. 4 (II), Limousin: Corrèze, Creuse, Haute-Vienne, 21 Musee Correze,
Ancien prieuré Saint-Pierre South Portal Identification 1 prieure 2 The texts are barely legible. It is not possible to date this inscription based solely on epigraphic evidence. The building was constructed in the twelfth century. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 135 Deux-Sevres,
Arnac-Pompadour Choir St. Peter 1 2 South entrance of sanctuary The 'S' is in the form of an inverted 'Z' which is representative of 11th century epigraphy. The text is close to John 21: 15-17, in which Christ says twice to Peter: Pasce agnos meos and the third time: Pasce oves meas. In the inscription the verb in the third person plural (pascunt) refers to the three figures represented on the capital. These figures could well be the three pastors of souls who were the principal patrons of the church at Arnac (st. Pardoux, Abbot of Guéret, and St. Martial). The inscription can be dated to the end of the 11th century. (See Camus, "Deux témoins de la sculpture romane du Bas-Limousin en Poitou: les chapiteaux de la chapelle de Saulgé", BM, 134, 1976, 98. pg. 38779 Gueret, temoins Saulge",
Arnac-Pompadour Nave Holy spirit and Virgin 1 1 In the nave, south side, third bay. The church is 2km northwest of Pompadour. It was an ancient priory of Saint-Martial de Limoges, consecrated in 1028. A second building was consecrated in 1102 under the patronate of the Holy Trinity and Saint Pardoux. The inscribed text is arranged vertically on the glory surrounding an angel and the Virgin. The inscription quotes exactly Luke 1:35: Spiritus sanctus superveniet in te et virtus Altissimi obumbrabit tibi, the angel's answer to Mary's question: Quomdo fiet istud, quoniam virum non cognosco? Vol. 4 (II), Limousin: Corrèze, Creuse, Haute-Vienne, 2 Correze,
Basilique Saint-Denis unknown Rich man and Lazarus 4 1 Inscriptions of two tituli. Under these inscriptions is represented the meal in the rich man's house, with three characters seated at the table. The rich man, in the middle, stretches out his right arm towards Lazarus, and two demons emerge from his hat. He is flanked by two figures, a companion on his right and another figure on his left, both in three-quarter view. The scene continues on the third side, with a brickwork. The soul of the rich man is turned towards the figure on the next face, who is Abraham. Titulus on the abacus. Next to it, Lazarus is protected in the bosom of Abraham, where only the right titulus on the abacus is kept. Another inscription on the scene, on the left, which is a response from Abraham. There are traces of an inscription on the astragal which is unreadable. Wyss, Michael, et Robert Favreau, 1992, « Saint-Denis. I. Sculptures romanes découvertes lors des fouilles urbaines », Bulletin Monumental, 150 (4), p. 329. null decouvertes null
Basilique Saint-Denis unknown Woman 1 2 Titulus on a fragment of a capital. Two capital fragments from the Orangerie of the Basilique garden, one with inscription. This inscription was interpreted based on an identical inscription of a Sainte-Geneviève church capital from the text of Genesis, II, 23. Wyss, Favreau, 1992 : 330. null Sainte-Genevieve null
Basilique Saint-Julien Narthex Avarice 1 1 South pier of narthex and tribune, east capital. The central figure is a winged demon seated on a throne, surrounded by two human-like, winged acolytes. The central demon is holding an opened book which bears the carved inscription At Brioude, like at Clermont-Ferrant, the words mile (mille) artifex designates a demon. The translation of artifex as "master" or artisan, relates to the demon as a type of anti-Majesty, or anti-Christ. Seated on a throne of flames, surrounded by eagles, the pose is similar to the composition of Christ in Majesty. The parody of the demon in a Christ in Majesty pose is emphasized by the inscribed term artifex, which was employed by Tertulian and Minucius to define God as the "Creator" or "Author." In a tenth-century Life of St. Martial (BnF, ms. lat. 3851A, fols. 30-33) the devil, prodded by St. Martial to give his name, referred to himself as mille artifex. The devil explained that he had a thousand arts to bring down man [Mille habeo artes ad decficiendum genus humanum.] vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 96 Puy-de-Dome,
Carennac Narthex artist's signature 4 1 Tailloir of 2 capitals, left of door; sculpted birds Capitals dated end 11th c., beg. 12th c. The formula, Benedicta sit anima ejus, frequently accompanies artists' signatures. It is always considered a wish for eternal life. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 94
Cathédrale Saint-Caprais Choir Martyrdom of St. Caprais 2 (Cathedrale 1 The first line of text is written on the face above the figures. The second line is written on the astragal. The text on the astragal forms a leonine hexameter. Four scenes are depicted on this capital. Each one is summed up by an inscribed verb on the corbeille. It is very probably, as suggested by Barrère, that one sould figure (anima, or spiritus?), was represented above the last scene (celestia scandit). The older passio of St. Caprais is not before the ninth century. Most of the hagiography relates the martyrdom of Caprais in assocation with that of St. Foy. According to the sources, Caprais, fleeing the persecution of Diocletian, took refuge in a cave. Learning of the arrest of St. Foy, he presented himself before the judge, Dacien, who sent a donkey. In the vitae the same words, Dacianus, praecipit and milites are found. This capital, which includes only Caprais, draws from the same sources: Dacien signifies the arrest of the dead, a soldier executes the sentence, Caprais, through his martyrdom, reaches paradise. The epigraphist and the art historian are in agreement for dating this text to the beginning of the 12th century. vol. 6, Gers, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, 112-113 Barrere, Pyrenees-Atlantiques,
Cathédrale Saint-Caprais Choir Raguel and Tobias 2 (Cathedrale 2 Capital of the transept, north side, east pier, west and east faces above the bishop's chair This capital illustrates a scene from the story of Tobias. Steered by the archangel Raphael, who came to heal his blindness, Tobias goes to the house of Raguel. Raguel's daughter, Sara, accused of being responsible for the death of seven husbands, he destroys the demon Asmodee (Tobias 3, 7-17).Apart from the biblical text, patristic sources give Tobias a double meaning. For Isidore of Seville, Raban Maur, and Hugh of St. Victor, Tobias is the image of the ancient Jewish law and a prefiguration of Christ. Capital dates to the beginning 12th century. vol. 6, Gers, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, 113-114 Pyrenees-Atlantiques,
Cathédrale Saint-Vincent Choir Disciples of Emmaus 3 (Cathedrale 1 Capital on pier separating the two arcades of the north bay. Dates to beginning of the 12th century. The source for this inscription is found in Luke 24, 13-32, the only gospel to tell the story of the disciples of Emmaüs. The inscription does not cite the biblical text exactly. vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 76-77 Emmaus. Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Catus Cloister Identification of personnage 1 1 Chapter House Capital depicting Christ's appearance to the apostles. The figure labeled Peter, holds two keys that form the letters P E Only the chapter house remains of the Romanesque priory. It is on the north side and the sculpture is of a high quality. C. 12th century. The chapter house at Catus dates to ca. 1140. See Horste, 97n182. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 95
Champeix Choir References the two columns built for the vestibule of the Temple of Jerusalem. 2 1 Impost blocks of two capitals situated at the entrance to the choir Text field for the north capital = 50cm The two names carved on the impost blocks refer to the two columns erected in the vestibule of the temple of Jerusalem, respectively named Jachin and Booz: Et statuit duas columnas in porticu templi; cumque statuisset et columnam dexteram, vocavit eam nomine Jachin; similiter erexit columnam secundam, et vocavit nomen ejus Booz (III Kings 7,21). [And he set up the two pillars in the porch of the temple: and when he had set up the pillar on the right hand, he called the name thereof Jachin: in like manner he set up the second pillar, and called the name thereof Booz.] This comparison places the church as a successor to the temple of Jerusalem. Jachin signifies "he strengthens" in Hebrew. The word is used in several other books in the Bible: Genesis 46, 10: The sons of Simeon: Jamuel and Jamin and Ahod, and Jachin and Sohar, and Saul the son of a woman of Chanaan; Exodus 6, 15: These are the kindreds of Ruben. The sons of Simeon: Jamuel, and Jamin and Ahod, and Jachin, and Soar, and Saul the son of a Chanaanitess: these are the families of Simeon; Numbers 26, 12: The sons of Simeon by their kindreds: Namuel, of him is the family of the Namuelites: Jamin, of him is the family of the Jaminites: Jachin, of him is the family of the Jachinites. Booz can be interpreted as "in him the force". The same name with a similar meaning is found in Ruth 2, 1: Now her husband Elimelech had a kinsman, a powerful man, and very rich, whose name was Booz. The two words toget mean: God establishes in strength. The early symbolism applies to the origin of the temple of Jerusalem and the people of Israel, and is reprised here in favor of the church, the temple of God, the Church, the people of God. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 156-157 Puy-de-Dome,
Cluny Choir tones of plain chant 3 1 Ambulatory Capitals are no longer in situ but have been attributed to the ambulatory. Currently housed in Musée Farinier. Two capitals are inscribed and are thought to have occupied the 8th and 9th columns when turning from left to right in the ambulatory See K. Meyer article, "The Eight Gregorian Modes of the Cluny Capitals," AB 34. vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 92-93 Musee Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Cluny Choir Seasons & Virtues 1 2 Capital is no longer in situ but has been attributed to the ambulatory. Currently housed in Musée Farinier. Seasons and Virtues are personified on faces of capital; contained in mandorlas. The inscriptions run along the interior of the mandorlas. The text accompanying Spring and Prudence are still legible. However, the inscription for Summer is fragmentary and the text for Justice has completely disappeared. Around the figure representing Spring, the inscription reads: VER PRIMOS FLORES PRIMOS PRODUCIT ODORES Around the figure representing Prudence it reads: DAT COGN[OSCEN]DUM PRUDENTIA Q[U]ID SIT AGENDU[M] Around the figure representing summer, accroding to the restitution of Abbot Pougnet: [FALX RESECAT SPICAS FER]VENS Q[U]AS DECO[QUIT] A[E]STAS. vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 94-95 Musee Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Collegiate of Saint-Gaudens Cloister 12 apostles 4 1 Capital is 51 x 38 cm. Ht. of letters: 0.7 cm. Capital dated to 12th century vol. 7 Ville de Toulouse, 71-73
Crypte de Saint-Girons Crypt Deliverance of St. Peter 4 1 Capital depicts St. Peter's deliverance from prison by an angel. The text is inscribed on arches surrounding figures on each face. The capital is 2.3 m from the ground. South side, 2nd capital from the axial bay The commentary of this scene forms a hexamter. One must read ferrea in place of ferea and ostia in place of hostia. The end of the inscription identifies the scene, using the infinitive for the narrative. The carved text on the capital narrates the imprisonment of Peter and his deliverance by an angel. The episode is reported in Acts (12, 3-12). Inscription dates to 12th century. vol. 6, Gers, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, 94-95 Pyrenees-Atlantiques,
Duravel Crypt Interlace with name 1 1 Crypt; south side According to Rey, a Duravel specialist, the inscription refers to Bernard IV, Bishop of Cahors (1068-1070), who most probably consecrated the crypt. This hypothesis is strengthened by the abbey's affiliation with Moissac from 1055. Quercy-Roman, 67
Eglise Choir Vegetable 1 1 Impost block of capital at the double arch at the entrance to the choir. Southeast of the nave. There is no record of this person. The formula of the inscription suggests that it is an artist, author, or donor inscription. The inscription dates to the end of the eleventh-beginning of the twelfth century. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 120 Deux-Sevres,
Église de l'Assomption Choir Seated figure 1 (Eglise 1 On the tailloir (impost) of a capital on the south side of a triumphal arc at entrance to choir. 2.63m from ground; length of inscription=80cm; height of 1st letter=12cm Inscription is dated to not before the first half of the 11th century. The text carved onto the impost block is very close to Leviticus 9.44: Ego enim sum Dominus Deus vester: sancti estote quia ego sanctus sum. But the inscription inverts estote and sancti and adds ego, which is not in the Vulgate nor in the vetus latina. Estote may come from Matthew 5.48: Estote ergo vos perfecti sicut et pater vester caelestis perfectus est. The Matthew passage is part of the liturgy for the Saturday afterday Ash Wednesday. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 42 Puy-de-Dome,
Eglise Notre-Dame Choir Gabriel 1 1 Choir, blind arcade on left; letters between 4-5.8 cm. As a corollary to the statue of the archangel, a statue of the Virgin occupies the blind arcade on the right. Both statues were defaced and disfigured, especially that of the Virgin, when they were painted in the 14th century. The inscription dates to the twelfth century. Vol. 2 Poitou-Charentes and Département de la Vienne (excepté la ville de Poitiers), 35 Departement (excepte
Eglise Notre-Dame Choir Christ 1 1 Capital is on the southeast square of the transept, 8-9 m. from ground Abridged citation from Apocalypse 1:8. The scene represents Christ giving the keys to the kingdom to St. Peter. Corpus dates to 12th century Vol. 5 Dordogne, Gironde, 79
Eglise priorale Choir/altar dedication (11th c) 1 1 Stone encased behind altar (86 x 32 cm. Height of 1st letter: 5.2 cm= 2in.) The formula used for the consecration of this altar is not very developed and only commemorates the act of consecration and the patronage of the altar. The inscription is dated to the 11th century based on paleographic and linguistic evidence. vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 54-55 Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Église Saint-André Choir Evangelists 2 (Eglise Saint-Andre) 1 Last capital in south bay at entrance of transept. Two figures represented with angelic traits, holding a banderole in their hands. The two evangelists are represented by angels, not their respective symbols. The only remnants of the Romanesque church are the nave, aisles and the transept. Probable date: First half tweflth century. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 149 Puy-de-Dome,
Église Saint-André Choir Passion of Saint Andrew 2 (Eglise Saint-Andre) 2 Southwest pier of transept. Scene represents the Passion of St. Andrew This capital depicts the crucifixion of St. Andrew, the older brother of St. Peter, who according to St. John (I, 40) was the first to follow Christ, at the same time as Peter (According to Matthew 4, 18 and Mark I, 16). According to his hagiographic legend, he was crucified at Patras, in Peloponnesia, on the orders of the proconsul, Egeas. This crucifixion equates Andrew to Peter, although the iconography differs from Peter. Until the 15th century, Andrew was represented frequently tied by rope, as seen here, on a latin cross, then followed on a cross in the form of an X. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 150 Puy-de-Dome,
Église Saint-André Choir Minotaur 1 (Eglise Saint-Andre) 3 Capital on the northwest pier of the transept. Western face The sculpture represents a centaur, but the word minotaur is written on its chest. It appears to be something between an inscription and graffiti. This capital demonstrates the confusion between the centaur and minotaur in the Middle Ages. This confusion is also found in two other ares of the Puy-de-Dôme: Maringues and Saint-Myon. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 150-151 Puy-de-Dome: Puy-de-Dome,
Église Saint-Julien Choir Angel 1 (Eglise 1 Capital of engaged column at opening of the ambulatory; north side Figure holds a banderole in hands Probable date: 12th century Another angel, holding an uninscribed banderole, is found on the other angle of the capital. It seems that the sculptor did not understand the real sense of the figures. The angels could represent the evangelists, like at Brioude, Notre-Dame-du-Port (Clermont-Ferrand), Volvic, or the capital from Mozac now found in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 159 Puy-de-Dome,
Eglise Saint-Michel Choir Daniel in the Lions' Den 1 1 Inscription is framed within a rectangle above the firgure's head. Capital is located at the entrance to the apse, on the south side. It is a double column. null Horste, Pl. 74 null
Eglise Saint-Michel Choir Meeting of Jacob & Esau 1 2 Entrance of choir on north side. Two bearded old men embrace. (Dated beg. 12th c.) The biblical source for the sceneis Genesis 33:4: Currens itaque Esaü obviam fratri suo, amplexatus est eum, stringensque collum ejus, et osculans flevit. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 137 Esau
Eglise Saint-Pierre, Aulnay (2nd half 12th c.) Choir Elephants 1 3 Capital in the south aisle, last bay of nave (towards east) Elephants are referred to as animals of war in Scripture. This animal is not represented in Early Christian monumental decoration, however it was a popular motif in Romanesque sculpture. In Poitou-Charentes, as well as Aulnay, the animals are sculpted on the facade of Notre-Dame-la-Grande and in the ambulatory of Saint-Jean de Montierneuf in Poitiers. Hugh of St. Victor viewed these animals as symbols of the battle against evil; he also viewed them as a sign of man and woman before original sin. He wrote: Cum autem venerit tempus pariendi, pergit ad lacum magnum, et ingreditur usque ad ubera, et ibidem parturit super aquam et hoc propter draconem facit quia insidiatur pullis ejus, et illi ipsi. Masculus autem non recedit a femina, sed custodit eam super stagnum aquarum parientem, ad arcendem draconem, ut dixi, inimicum. Isti autem duo elephantes masculus et femina figuram habent Adam et Evae, qui erant in paradiso Dei ante prevaricationem gloria circumdati, nescientes ullum malum, non concupiscentiae desiderium, non commistionis coitum. [De bestiis et aliis rebus, lib. II, cap. XXX (PL, t. 177, col. 71). Rabanus Maurus wrote earlier: "Quando autem parturiunt, in aquis vel in insulis dimittunt foetus propter dracones, quia inimici sunt, et ab eis implicati necantur" (De Universo, libr. XXII, cap. VIII dans PL, t. 111, col 221).] This comparison is of interest when one considers a neighboring capital at Aulnay that represents the offering and murder of Abel, consequences of Original Sin. It is evident that the sculptors had never seen an elephant with their own eyes. The sculpture was probably modeled after fabric or an ivory from the East. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 81 Deux-Sevres,
Eglise Saint-Pierre, Aulnay (2nd half 12th c.) Choir Abel & Cain 1 4 Capital of the square of the north transept, nave-side The capital's iconography represents the offering of Abel, but not that of Cain, as well as Abel's murder by Cain (Genesis 4, 3-8). A similar theme is found at Saint-Savin. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 82 Deux-Sevres,
Eglise Saint-Pierre, Aulnay (2nd half 12th c.) Choir Samson 1 5 Crossing, southwest pier, western capital. The story of Samson is depicted on this capital. The scene represented here illustrates the ruse of Delilah as recounted in Judges 16.19: At illa dormire eum fecit super gena sua et in sinu suo reclinare caput, vocavitque tonsorem et rasit septem crines ejus. Vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 83 Deux-Sevres,
Eglise Saint-Sauveur Nave Consecration of altar 1 1 Located in the south aisle on a pier separating the first and second bays. The inscription is inscribed on the wall and column, approximate 5.5 m high. Follows the formula for altar consecrations of the period: Date + act of consecration + consecrator + patronage The church of Figeac was consecrated in 1093. Geraud III of Cardaillac was bishop of Cahors from 1093 to 1112. It is probable that this altar was consecrated by him. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 99
Eglise Saint-Sauveur (2nd half 11th c) Choir Satan 1 1 Crossing, southwest capital. Inscription forms a hexameter. It is not possible to identify the iconography of this capital. Three monsters are depicted on the capital. The bodies are covered in scales. The inscription is reminiscent of chapters 12 and 13 of Apocalypse. (Apoc. 12, 9; 13, 7-8; 17, 14). Paleographical analysis dates the inscription to second half of the 11th century. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres. 111 Deux-Sevres.
Eglise Saint-Savinien, Melle Transept Donor/ sculptor? 2 2 The capital is located atop an engaged column at the southeast angle of the crossing. The inscription is engraved on the capital's west face. (Height of corbeille: approx. 35cm). Dates to the end 11th-beg. 12th c) Pax vobis: words pronounced by Christ when he appeared before the apostles after his resurrection. This is found in Luck 24:36 and John 20: 21, 26. The inscription is attributed to the late eleventh or beginning twelfth century. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 137-138 Deux-Sevres,
Eglise Saint-Savinien, Melle Transept Passion of Saint Savininen of Troyes 1 3 The capital is located atop an engaged column at the northeast angle of the crossing. The inscription is engraved on the capital's south face. (Ht. of corbeille: approx. 35cm). Figure holds the left arm of executioner. The author of the inscription was inspired by the Passions of St. Savinien of Troyes, who is the only Savinien who was beheaded (cephalore=head-carrier). Not one of the three vitae can be considered historically accurate, but the inscription does place Savinien's martyrdom under the reign of Aurelian and it mentions how he was killed. S. Savinianus, apprehendens caput suum, portavit illud pedes quadraginta novem. The success of the Passions of St. Savinien of Troyes ast the end of the eleventh century resulted in its inclusion in the Golden Legend. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 138 Deux-Sevres,
Eglise Saint-Savinien, Melle West Portal ? 1 1 At the west portal a Christ in Majesty is sculpted above the lintel. The inscription, in poor condition, runs around the medallion. Only a trace of the letters exist. Source is: LE ROUX, H., Recherches sur l'église Saint-Savinien de Melle, "Bull. Soc. Antiq. Ouest", 4e sér., t. VII, 1963-1964, pp. 251-303. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres. 136 l'eglise ser., Deux-Sevres.
Eglise Saint-Seurin West entrance Sacrifice of Isaac 1 1 Capital is in the enclosed porch at the church's west entrance, first column on north side. 270 cm from ground The scene corresponds to the Sacrifice of Isaac as described in Genesis, 22: 9-12. Vol. 5 Dordogne, Gironde, 93
Eglise Saint-Thomas Choir Decorative and dedication 2 1 Text is carved on the impost blocks of two capitals located behind the altar in the apse. The word, episcopum, and the date help situate the inscribed texte as a fragment of a dedication and consecration inscription. It can be dated to the 11th century. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 112 Deux-Sevres,
Iglesia de San Quirce North-east, choir Abel and Cain 3 3 Inscription appears twice: on the abacus and in the upper part of the scene. Left side: a bearded figure (Cain) cultivates the land, and oxen walk in front of him. Main side: Abel and Cain present their offerings: a lamb for the first, and a sheaf for the second. Above, we can see the hand of God, two fingers pointing towards Abel. Right side: Cain holds his brother by the hair and raises an axe in his right hand. Capitals 1 to 5 follow a narrative order. Pérez de Urbel, J. Et W. M. Whitehill (1931). « La iglesia románica de San Quirce », Boletín de la Real Academia de la Historia, Tome 98, p. 795-812. García Morilla, Alejandro (2015). Corpus Inscriptionum Hispaniae Medievalium. Burgos (siglos VIII-XIII), Vol.1, Universidad de León, Servicio de Publicaciones, p. 121-122. null Perez romanica Boletin 795-812. Garcia Leon, null
Iglesia de San Quirce North-west, nave Original sin. 2 1 Inscription on the whole abacus. Left side: A figure (God) stands before Adam and Eve, raising his right hand in reproach. He is distinguished by the cruciferous nimbus. Main side: Adam and Eve are standing next to the tree, on which a snake is coiled. Adam is holding an apple in his mouth, and Eve is holding another. Right side: an angel with a long stick in his left hand and a sword in his right hand. In front of him, Adam and Eve are leaving the Garden. Capitals 1 to 5 follow a narrative order. Pérez de Urbel, J. Et W. M. Whitehill (1931). « La iglesia románica de San Quirce », Boletín de la Real Academia de la Historia, Tome 98, p. 795-812. García Morilla, Alejandro (2015). Corpus Inscriptionum Hispaniae Medievalium. Burgos (siglos VIII-XIII), Vol.1, Universidad de León, Servicio de Publicaciones, p. 121-122. null Perez romanica Boletin 795-812. Garcia Leon, null
Iglesia de San Quirce north-west, transept Abel 1 2 Inscription appears twice: on the abacus and under it, in the upper part of the scene. Main side: hooded figure (Abel) holding a stick. In front of him, a goat stands on its hind legs to feed on the shrub in front of it. Right side: two goats fighting, and a sheep. Capitals 1 to 5 follow a narrative order. Pérez de Urbel, J. Et W. M. Whitehill (1931). « La iglesia románica de San Quirce », Boletín de la Real Academia de la Historia, Tome 98, p. 795-812. García Morilla, Alejandro (2015). Corpus Inscriptionum Hispaniae Medievalium. Burgos (siglos VIII-XIII), Vol.1, Universidad de León, Servicio de Publicaciones, p. 121-122 null Perez romanica Boletin 795-812. Garcia Leon, null
Iglesia de San Quirce South-east, choir Noah's Ark 2 4 Left side: God stands before Cain, who reaches out to the next scene dedicated to Noah. Main side: Noah building the ark. He is holding a hammer, and in front of him, in the upper part, is God with a cross in his right hand. Capitals 1 to 5 follow a narrative order. Pérez de Urbel, J. Et W. M. Whitehill (1931). « La iglesia románica de San Quirce », Boletín de la Real Academia de la Historia, Tome 98, p. 795-812. García Morilla, Alejandro (2015). Corpus Inscriptionum Hispaniae Medievalium. Burgos (siglos VIII-XIII), Vol.1, Universidad de León, Servicio de Publicaciones, p. 121-122. null Perez romanica Boletin 795-812. Garcia Leon, null
Iglesia de San Quirce South-east, choir Christ in majesty 1 6 Inscription on the mandorla. On the front, there is a majestic Christ in a mandorla, with his left hand raised and his right hand holding a book. He is flanked by two winged angels clutching the mandorla. Pérez de Urbel, J. Et W. M. Whitehill (1931). « La iglesia románica de San Quirce », Boletín de la Real Academia de la Historia, Tome 98, p. 795-812. García Morilla, Alejandro (2015). Corpus Inscriptionum Hispaniae Medievalium. Burgos (siglos VIII-XIII), Vol.1, Universidad de León, Servicio de Publicaciones, p. 121-122. null Perez romanica Boletin 795-812. Garcia Leon, null
Iglesia de San Quirce South-west, transept Isaac's sacrifice. 1 5 Two sides. Inscription on the abacus and on the upper part of the scene. Left side: a winged angel pushes a kid towards the next scene. A face appears at the top right of the scene. Right side: Abraham is holding Isaac by the hair and a knife in his right hand. Capitals 1 to 5 follow a narrative order. Pérez de Urbel, J. Et W. M. Whitehill (1931). « La iglesia románica de San Quirce », Boletín de la Real Academia de la Historia, Tome 98, p. 795-812. García Morilla, Alejandro (2015). Corpus Inscriptionum Hispaniae Medievalium. Burgos (siglos VIII-XIII), Vol.1, Universidad de León, Servicio de Publicaciones, p. 121-122. null Perez romanica Boletin 795-812. Garcia Leon, null
La Daurade Cloister Daniel in the Lion's Den 2 1 Same composition as Moissac. Letters approx. 1.5 cm Art historians have found many analogies between this capital and the one in the cloister at Moissac, which represents the same scene. This capital is attributed to the first atelier of La Daurade. The paleography of the inscription confirms this attribution and dates the capitals to the last years of the 11th century according to Lafargue. However, Durliat's date of post 1100 is now generally accepted. vol. 7 Ville de Toulouse, 66
La Daurade Cloister Transfiguration 1 2 Letters approx. 1 cm. The Transfiguration as told in Mat. 27 1-8; Mark 9, 1-8; Luke 9, 28-36, is a subject in which the plastic Transposition has posed difficulties for medieval artists. The earliest representations return to the Lives mosaic at Sainte-Catherine of Sinaï and mosaic of Saints Apôtres à Constantinople). But from the 11th century, due to byzantine artistic influences, the scene showed a harmonious development in the West. This theme remains relatively rare in iconography, and it is found mostly in Cluniac monasteries where the Transfiguration was part of a solemn feast. Peter the venerable composed the office. vol. 7 Ville de Toulouse, 67 Sinai Apotres a
La Daurade Cloister Meeting of Christ and the Canaanite 1 3 Jesus turns towards one of the two apostles accompanying him. This biblical quotation is from the episode in which Jesus and the Canaanite meet. Marie Lafargue thinks that this fragment of the capital could be part of the Transfiguration capital. She gives no justification for the this suggestion. Citation: Non sum missus nisi ad oves que perierunt domus Israel (Mt. 15, 24). vol. 7 Ville de Toulouse, 68
La Daurade Cloister Last Judgment 2 4 Letters approx. 0.7 cm. On the main face the archangel St. Michael holds a balance, on his right is a demon holding a banner with writing. On another face a winged angel holding a cross in its right hand and a book with writing in his other. The words: In ignem eternum et Venite benedicti Patris are from a verse in Matthew that comment on the Second Coming and the Last Judgment: Discedite a me, maledicti, in ignem aeternum, qui paratus est diabolo et angelis ejus (Mt. 25, 41). Christ addresses the elect: Venite, benedicti Patris mei, possidete paratum vobis regnum a constitutione mundi (Mt. 25, 34). The two inscriptions relate to the iconography of the capitals. The first illustrates the conviction of a person for whom the verdict of weighing of souls was unfavorable and expects to take him to his punishment, the devil is placed at the edge of the face. The second text, engraved in a small corner continues to be illustrated by the two other faces of the capital. On the main face, opposite the face depicting the weighing of souls, one can see two elect moving toward the celestial Jerusalem. M. Durliat relates this capital to the same atelier at La Daurade, noting that these are the first two representations of the Last Judgment "in the entire history of Romanesque sculpture." vol. 7 Ville de Toulouse, 68
La Daurade Cloister Musicians of King David 1 5 Text is not visible today. Transcription is according to Rachou. The source for the inscription is scriptural. (I Par. 15, 16-17). Four of the musicians are represented with their instruments. It is comparable to a capital in the cloister at Moissac. vol. 7 Ville de Toulouse, 70
La Daurade Cloister Rivers of Paradise 2 6 Letters approx. 2.8cm. High. The names of the four rivers of Paradise are found in Scripture (Gen. 2, 11-14). The Tigris and Euphrates are well known; the other two are identified by medieval authors with the Nile and the Ganges or Indus. Christian authors attached symbolic values to these rivers. Each of the four rivers correspond to the four evangelists and their symbols, the four cardinal virtues, the four elements, the four ages of the world, the four orders of society, the four spokes of the divine wheel, the four foods, and the four ways to interpret history. vol. 7 Ville de Toulouse, 71
Le Puy, Cathedral Cloister Evangelists 5 1 Capital is at corner of the east and north galleries (double-column). Height of letters = approx. 2 cm. The history of the cloister is not well known. The imprecision of the texts only allow approximate dating for the work on the claustral buildings of the cathedral to the beginning of the twelfth century. The writing on the two capitals agrees with the first quarter of the twelfth century. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 117 Puy-de-Dome,
Le Puy, Musée Crozatier North Portal Cardinal Virtue 1 Musee 2 Capital from the Charity portal, called the Hôtel-Dieu, Cathedral. Portal is located on the north side of the Cathedral Notre-Dame. A seated woman, dressed as a nun, is located on the center of the capital. She holds a sack of money, symbolizing alms, in her right hand. On another face of this capital is a bearded apostle. It is thought to be St. James, also seen on the cathedral's portal Bourg-Argental.The figure at the portal is identified by the inscrpition on the banderole that he carries that references one of his letters. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 133-4 Hotel-Dieu, Puy-de-Dome,
Le Puy, Musée Crozatier Steeple Cardinal Virtues 4 Musee 1 Capital from the pyramidal steeple of the cathedral Height of letters = 3.5 cm. A cardinal virtue (with helmet and armor) is portrayed on each face. The figures are nimbed. Probable date: 12th century The Virtues are depicted carrying a breastplate, arms and shields, inspired by St. Paul: Propterea accipite armaturam Dei… State ego succincti lumbos vestros in veritate et induti loricam justiciae et calceati pedes in praeparatione evagelili pacis; in omnibus sumentes scutum fidei... Et galeam adsumite et gladium spiritus, quod est verbum Dei (Ephesians 6, 13-17). Therefore take unto you the armor of God, that you may be able to resist in the evil day, and to stand in all things perfect. 14 Stand therefore, having your loins girt about with truth, and having on the breastplate of justice, 15 And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace: 16 In all things taking the shield of faith, wherewith you may be able to extinguish all the fiery darts of the most wicked one. 17 And take unto you the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit (which is the word of God). vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 134-135 Puy-de-Dome,
Lescar Choir Announcement to the Shepherds and Adoration of the Magi 1 1 Capital of engaged column between choir and north absidiole Inscription is on the astragl The Adoration of the Magi (Mt. 2, 1-12) is a widespread theme, but is rarely associated in sculpture with the Announcement to the Shepherds. (Luke 2, 8-20). There is a liturgical justificaiton for this association: Epiphany. The Announcement to the Shepherds and the Adoration of the Magi are mentioned at the same time on Epiphany (cf. Bréviaire, Ier Nocturne, 4e et 5e leçons). The Virgin and Child are placed between the shepherds and the Magi. Dates to 12th century. vol. 6, Gers, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, 155 Breviaire, lecons). Pyrenees-Atlantiques,
Lubersac Choir Jesus among the doctors 1 1 Inscription is above the heads of the figures. They are not visible from the ground. North absidiol, north capital This is a rare depiction of two doctors of the Law. Both the lawyers chosen to talk with Christ, Nicodemus and Gamaliel are not mentioned in Scripture in relation to this scene, but their names appear several times in Scripture. Inscription dates to 12th century. Vol. 4 (II), Limousin: Corrèze, Creuse, Haute-Vienne, 45-50 Correze,
Maringues Choir Minotaur 2 1 Ambulatory, south chapel North and south faces of the corbel represent two monsters facing each other and the bust of a human with an animal's body. The figures are horned. This capital is similar to one at Besse-en-Chandesse where the monster is represented and labeled by the inscription Minortaurus. However the figure has the attributes of a centaur. The inscribed minotaur capital at Brioude conforms to mythology. The church of Maringues was at one time served by the monks of La Chaise-Dieu. The church was one of the possessions of La Chaise-Dieu at this time. Dates to 12th century vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 219 Puy-de-Dome,
Maringues Choir archangels 2 2 Choir/ axial chapel of chevet, capital on south side The south and north faces of the capital, on the imposts are sculted with winged archangels. Each angel holds a banderole with their name carved on it. The noun angelus is employed frequently for archangels, the generic sense of the word suggests the hierarchical order of angels in which the archangels constitute a part. Dates to 12th century vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 220 Puy-de-Dome,
Maringues Choir Healing of Lepers 1 3 Choir/ axial chapel of chevet, third capital on the chevet's rond-point A man is kneeling with his hands reaching towards Christ, who is offering a blessing. The inscription is on a cartouche above the scene. The text comes from Luke 17,17, which reports Jesus' healing of ten lepers. Only one of them, a Samartin, returns to give thanks for his healing. Dates to 12th century. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 220 Puy-de-Dome,
Menat Choir Signature 4 1 Capital of the first arc between the crossing and nave, towards the west, on the south side. Approx. 5m from ground. Lions are on the faces. Dates to late 11th century. Marie-Thérèse Camus, in her study of twelfth-century Poitevin sculpture, specifies that at this time the Poitevin atelier particpated in constructions in the Limousin and the Auvergne, in which a bas-relief in the church at Menat is analogous to this sculpture. The epigraphy agrees with this and limits the date of the inscription to the end of the 11th century. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 221 Marie-Therese Puy-de-Dome,
Mozac Choir Evangelists 4 1 Angels holding banderoles. Sarah Carrig Bond's dissertation locates this deposed capital at the entrance to the choir, in the rond-point [check if it is south side] Now in V&A. The inscriptions are the first verses of the gospel. In order of the citations presened here, we find Matthew (1,1), Mark (1,3), Luc (1,5), and John (1,1). vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 228-229 Puy-de-Dome,
Musée du Petit Palais Notre-Dame-des-Doms? Job 3 (Musee 1 Letters approx. 1cm. Museum acquired the capital in 1837. Capital dates to 12th century. The entire story of Job is represented on this capital. vol. 13, Gard, Lozère, Vaucluse, 133-134 Lozere,
Notre-Dame-du-Port Choir Sacrifice of Isaac 2 1 Capital supporting a fallen arcade in the middle of the south transept façade. Dating for Notre-Dame-du-Port is ca. 1185. The Corpus dates the inscriptions to second half of the 12th century. The relatively late development of oncials in the Auvergne, and Notre-Dame-du-Port in particuliar, suggest that the inscription can be attributed to the second half of the twelfth century. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 193 facade. Puy-de-Dome,
Notre-Dame-du-Port Choir Punishment of usurer 1 3 Capital at south side entry to ambulatory On the three faces of the capital is a representation of the punishment of the usuer. On the principal face a kneeling nude figure is between two demons, who are pulling on a cord around the nude figure's neck. A banderole stretches across the three faces. The latin is clumsy and incorrect: prisist in place of periisti, ussura for usura. The last three letters are enigmatic. The commentary that accompanies this scene is almost identical to that which identifies an analogous scene at Saint-Julien de Brioude. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 195 Puy-de-Dome,
Notre-Dame-du-Port Choir Virtues and Vices 8 4 Capital of the second column in choir, northeast side. Two armed virtues one with a shield, the other with a lance pointed at two Vices. A nude and disheveled woman with a sword stuck in her throat Full translation: An angel. In honor of St. Mary, Stephen ordered me to be made. Generosity. Charity. Anger kills itself. The demon fights against the Virtues. Charity. Avarice. It hides in his treasury. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 195-196 Puy-de-Dome,
Notre-Dame-du-Port Choir Announcement of the Precursor and the Redeemer 7 5 Capital on the 4th column of choir, northeast side Angel announces to Zacharia the birth of John the Baptist while pulling Zacharias's beard This capital comprises three annunciations and visitations. The first annunciation concerns Zachariah, who learns from an angel that he will have a son named John. Luke (I, 11-13): Apparuit autem illi angelus Domini, stans a dextris altaris incensi... Ait autem ad illum angelus : Ne timeas, Zacharia, quoniam exaudita est deprecatio tua, et uxor tua Elisabeth pariet tibi filium, et vocabis nomen ejus Joannem. The iconographic is faithful to the biblical text, the angel is represented to the right of the altar's incense, where Zachariah officiates. When John the Baptist is born, Zachariah, who was told what to name the newborn, carried a tablet on which he wrote: Joannes est nomen ejus (Luc 1,63), the verse found on the next scene. The Visitation, is simply evoked by the word reported by Luke (I, 39-46). The second annunciation described on the capital is the ultimate Annunciation, that of the angel Gabriel to the Virign, inspired by the text at the beginning of Luke (I, 28). Ave gratia plena. The third Annuncation is the apparition of the angel to Joseph (Dream of Joseph). The words on the capital condense the text of St. Matthew (I, 19): Joseph vir ejus cum esset justus et nollet eam traducere, voluit occulte dimittere eam. The Rotbertus who signed the capitals could also be the author/artist of the neighboring capitals--the style is very close. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 197-199 Puy-de-Dome,
Notre-Dame-du-Port Choir Original Sin 1 6 Capital of the fifth column in choir (from the north) On the northeast face Eve is at the center, presenting grapes to Adam. On the northwest face is God. The text carved on this capital is from Genesis III, 22: Ecce Adam quasi unus ex nobis factus, sciens bonum et malum. Unfortunately, the carver made a mistake that contradicts the biblical text. The replacement of nobis for vobis stresses the human nature of Adam, whereas the biblical text emphasizes his desire to be equal to God. It is interesting that the fruit depicted on the northeast face is a bunch of raisins, and not the traditional apple or fig. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 199-200 Puy-de-Dome,
Notre-Dame-du-Port Choir Assumption 4 7 Choir Capital of 6th column in choir, counting from north The southwest face represents the resurrection and assumption of the Virgin. Christ, in heaven, carries her to heaven in his arms. The Virgin is resuscitated, shown by her open eyes. Underneath is an empty sarcophagus. The book of Life, in which the names of the predestined are written, is mentioned in Apocalypse (3, 5; 13,8; 20,12, 15; 21, 27). vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 200 Puy-de-Dome,
Notre-Dame-du-Port Nave Evangelists 1 2 North side, third pillar from the transept. Western capital The theme of the evangelists represented by angels, and not the symbols of the tetramorph is an iconographic variation widespread in the Auvergne (Mozac, Volvic). It is also found at Conques at the beginning of the twelfth century, with archangels and evangelists represented in the same way. The proposed dating for the inscriptions on this capital and the other capitals in the choir remain hypothetical, but it seems both the sculpture and the inscriptions suggest that the capitals date slightly earlier than the inscriptions and scenes that adorn the south portal. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 194 Puy-de-Dome,
Notre-Dame-du-Port Nave/ Choir? Heads (artist's signature?) 1 8 Capital in nave, south side, just before the crossing This name most probably corresponds to that of the sculptor. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 202 Puy-de-Dome,
Notre-Dame-la-Grande Choir Sculptor or donor 1 1 Dated end of 11th and beginning of 12th century Decorative 3rd on north side The name Rotbertus is the name of the sculptor or donor. The placement and arrangement of the text on the capital corresponds to analogous inscriptions from the regions (see Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, Saint-Pierre de Chauvigny, et Saint-Hilaire de Melle). The remaining text is an enigma. One hypothesis suggests that it is a form of v[eni] auster, from the Song of Songs (4, 16), which is found at the the beginning of a twelfth-century sermon found in the Distinctiones of Pierre de Poitiers (Haureau, "Notices et extraits de quelques manuscrits latins de la Bibliothèque nationale, t. I, Paris 1890, p.19[ms. lat. 455]. Vol. 1 Ville de Poitiers, 21 Bibliotheque
Notre-Dame-la-Grande Choir made me 1 2 Nimbed figures Ambulatory, south side, right of axial chapel, only historiated capital null Vol. 1 Ville de Poitiers, 22 null
Orcival Nave Avarice 1 1 Figure personifying avarice with a sack tied around his neck flanked by two demons. First pier from the west in the nave. The first word of the inscriptions appears to be in the vernacular. This theme was widespread in the Auvergne, the punishment of Avarice is found at Besse-en-Chandesse, Ennezat, Notre-Dame-du-Port de Clermont-Ferrand. Dated 12th century. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 231 Puy-de-Dome,
Parthenay-le-Vieux Choir Lions 1 1 Located at the arch at the entrance to the choir north capital. Inscribed over the head of the animals Lions were a popular motif used during the Romanesque period. The lion symbolized many things: a decorative motif, a symbol of evil, a being that helps good triumph, or a symbol of the good, courage or of Christ. Paleographic analysis of the inscription on the capital dates to the twelfth century. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 153 Deux-Sevres,
Parthenay-le-Vieux Choir Capricorn 1 2 Located at the arch at the entrance to the choir, south capital. inscribed on impost block (12th c.) Commentaries on the constellations from Argenton-Chateau, Aulnay, and Fenioux discuss the Capricorn. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 153 Deux-Sevres,
Parthenay-le-Vieux Transept Sirens 1 3 Southeast pillar of transept Sirens symbolize the forces of evil, particularly temptation. In the Middle Ages, the origin of the symbol was attributed to the Odyssey, as described by Hildebert de Lavardin: (PL, CLXXI, col. 1222): Sirenes sunt monstra maris resonantia magnis, Ad quas incauti veniunt saepissime nautae, Quae faciunt sonitum nimia dulcedine vocum, Et modo naufragium, modo dant mortale periclum. The iconography of this capital is very similar to the two sirens/fish sculpted at Saint-Eutrope de Saintes. vol. 3, Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres, 154 Deux-Sevres,
Saint-Austremoine Choir Annunciation 1 1 Capital of column at left of entrance to abside, on the south arm of the transept. Two angels look to the Virgin. The angel on the left makes a gesture of salutation, the angel on the right holds an open book with inscription The angelic greeting is in Luke (1, 28) but this is the liturgical formula. The second part of the text, Spiritus sanctus super[veniet in te] is found in LuK 1,35. This scene is also found in the same place at Issoire, at the beginning of an iconographic program in the sanctuary that is reserved for the themes of the Passion and Resurrection of Christ.The capital can be dated to the tweflth century. See Skubiszewski, "Une Annonication à deux anges à Issoire," dans De la création à la restauration. Travaux d'histoire de l'art offerts à Marcel Durliat pour sons 75e anniversaire, Toulouse, 1992, 307-317. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 217-218 a creation Puy-de-Dome,
Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire Choir Hugh and St. Mary 3 (Saint-Benoit-sur-Loire) 5 South side at the blind triforium level These are two capitals next to each other. Hugh is east of Mary The first capital alludes to a competition between the king's candidate and the monks' for succeeding Abbot Joscerand (d. April 1096). His successor, Abbot Simon, was not elected until 1103. The monk, Hitier, is thought to be a dignatory of the abbey. This identification is based on the key he is holding, which is frequently interpreted as a sign of trust. The second capital represents the monk, Hugh, and St. Benedict. St. Benedict introduces Hugh to the Virgin, who is seated on a throne. not yet published
Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire Porch artist's signature 1 (Saint-Benoit-sur-Loire) 1 Ground floor of porch, second pier on west coming from south, south capital, south side, south face; inscription in situ Artist's signature not yet published
Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire Porch Apocalypse 3 (Saint-Benoit-sur-Loire) 2 Ground floor of porch; first pier to the west of the south side (#11 du plan). Inscription housed at Musée lapidaire Capital references the beginning of Apocalypse I, 10-20, especially verses 11 and 16. Apocalypse I, 11: Quod vides scribe in libro et mitte septem ecclesiis quae sunt in Asia… et le verset. Apocalypse I, 16: et habebat in dextera sua sellas septem et de ores eius gladius utarque parte acutus exibat fournissent la source des textes et des sculptures (les sept chandeliers d’or au-dessus de Jean sont évoquées dans le verset 12: …et converses vidi septem candelabra aurea… Vergnolle proposed that the inscription SEPTEM ECCLESIAE is modern. [p. 96 (text); n. 315, p. 297] not yet published Musee evoquees
Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire Transept Hugh, donor capital 6 (Saint-Benoit-sur-Loire) 3 North arm of transept: capital left from entry to the first chapel in the ambulatory; Inscription in situ Cleopas miles A (omega) Hugo miles Hugo mo[nacus] Petrus Miles III fraters rviiz svz Hugo m[on]acus Od[a Abridged citation of Apocalypse I, 1, 8 Ego sum alpha et omega principium et finis. This capital is a scene of homage to Christ by the parents of Hugh (mother Oda, father Hugues), and his three brothers (Hugh, Cleopas, Petrus) written between 1102-1119 null null
Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire Transept Daniel & Habacuc 2 (Saint-Benoit-sur-Loire) 4 Capital located in the north transept. The inscription in situ On this capital the angel Gabriel (angelus Domini) carries the prophet Habacuc over the lions' den so that Habacuc can feed Daniel. Daniel is imprisoned for killing the dragon, Bel (See Daniel 14, 28-30): et dixerunt cim venissent ad regem: Trade nobis Danielem, alioquin interficiemus te et domum tuam… et necessitate compulsus tradidit eis Danielem. Qui miserunt eum in lacu leonum…. not yet published
Saint-Caprais-de-Lerm Choir Annunciation 2 1 Southeast capital, facing north and west. This scene illustrates the Annunciation of the Angel to Mary and the Vistitation of Mary to Elizabeth. The quotation is from Scripture (Luke, 1,28), but is transmitted through the channel of liturgy. There is an epigraphic similarity between this inscription and that at Bon-Encontre, but this capital does not date before the end of the twelfth century. vol. 6, Gers, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, 132 Pyrenees-Atlantiques,
Saint-Caprais-de-Lerm Choir Martyrdom of St. Caprais 3 2 Northeast capital in choir. The martyrdom of St. Caprais is represented on this capital. vol. 6, Gers, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, 133 Pyrenees-Atlantiques,
Sainte-Foy Choir Sacrifice of Isaac 2 1 South side Above the scene, in a cruciform nimb The sacrifice of Isaac (Gen. 22: 1-14) is among the most represented in religious sculpture. The theme reached its apogee in the romanesque period, specifically throughout the twelfth century. The Fathers viewed this as a prefiguration of Christ's sacrifice, especially when the sacrifice of Isaac is sculpted on capitals near the sanctuary, as at Conques. The carved text here is very similar to a 7th century inscription that accompanies a sculpted representation of the sacrifice of Isaac at San Pedro de la Nave: + Ubi Habraam obtulit Isaac filium suum olocaupstum Domino. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 26-27
Sainte-Foy Choir Crucifixion of St. Peter 1 2 South Transept; Capital at entrance to first chapel south of main altar. Chapel was dedicated to Ss. Peter and Paul and is now dedicated to St.Fo. Not in Corpus.
Sainte-Foy Choir artist's signature 1 3 Angel holding a banderole which bears inscription. Located in the south transept tribune, right colonnette. Dates to 12th century The expression me fecit is often used by an artist/author, or a donor. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 33
Sainte-Foy Choir/ crossing Evangelists and Angels 4 5 Angels labeled as evangelists and angels adorn the four capitals on the two piers at the crossing (northwest and southwest). The capitals are dated to the end of the 11th- beginning of the 12th century. Representations of the evangelists as angels is not unusual and was found most often in the Auvergne. This iconographic analogue is found at Notre-Dame-du-Port (Clermont-Ferrand), Volvic, and Mozac. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 31-32
Sainte-Foy Cloister David and his musicians 2 6 Capital came from cloister and was transferred to the Musée lapidaire. It is now conserved in a chapel in the north transept. Dates to the first half 12th century. A similar capital is in the cloister at Moissac, citing four names of musicians other than David. The names are in Scripture, but the sculpture at Conques and Moissac does not reflect exactly the instruments. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 36-37 Musee
Sainte-Foy Nave Avarice 2 4 Tribune; nave, first pier west of the north transept A figure depicting the sin of avarice (moneybag hanging from neck), surrounded by four grimacing demons. A banderole is held by all the characters. Dates to the end of the 11th century. The theme of the sin of avarice is known particularly in the Auvergne. It is found at Brioude, Clermont-Ferrand (Notre-Dame-du-Port), Ennezat, and Orcival. The capital at Conques is very similar to the one at Notre-Dame-du-Port, including the inscription. vol. 9, Aveyron, Lot, Tarn, 30-31
Sainte-Lucie Tribune Daniel 2 1 Church tribune, capital on North wall. First letter = 3.5 cm. Height of B in bestia = 6.5 cm. Dates to 12th century. The iconography of this capital comes from two sources: the Bible and legend. The figure on the main face is labeled Daniel, and he is surrounded by two beasts. This configuration is usually attributed to Daniel and the Lions. But the carved scene does not relate directly to the episode of Daniel in the lions' den. The sculpted scene most probably relates to Daniels triumph over the idol Bel and the dragon, the episode for which he was thrown into the lions' den. The inscribed text, Bestia plena doli non est is close to King Astyage's exclamation to the idol Bel. rapprocher de l'exclamation admirative du roi Astyage face à l'idole Bel: Magnus es, Bel, et non est apud te dolus quiquam (Dan. 14, 17). This biblical passage relates to a local legend. A dragon named Jaille devastated the local countryside, and the town took its name from this monster. vol. 16, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Hautes-Alpes, Ardèche, Drôme, 144-145 a Ardeche, Drome,
Sainte-Marie-Madeleine Narthex Election of Jacob (#7) 2 1 Inscription identifies the figures carved on the capital. (c. 1140-1150) Based on the identifying inscriptions and the iconography of the carved imagery, the capital's subject matter is inspired by the story of Jacob and Esau (Genesis 25, 24-32). vol. 21 Yonne, 234
Sainte-Marie-Madeleine Narthex Peter and Paul (#9) 1 2 Identification of personnages Dom Berland identifies the scene as related to the legend of St. Benigne, the apostle of Burgundy (Berland, "Essai d'interprétation d'un chapiteau de Vézelay", p.65). At the moment of his martyrdom, the saint's feet are encased in lead. The apostles Peter and Paul, assisted by St. Benigne's prayers, fortify him through his passion. The fawn that appears on the capital could be the famed dog that Aurelian ordered loose on the martyr. On the right face, uninscribed, a seated figure is most probably Aurelian. vol. 21 Yonne, 234-235 d'interpretation Vezelay",
Sainte-Marie-Madeleine Narthex Temptation of St. Benedict (#11) 1 3 Identification of personnages Temptation of St. Benedict (Book Two of the Gregory the Great's Dialogues). vol. 21 Yonne, 235
Sainte-Marie-Madeleine Narthex Tobie and archangel 1 5 Narthex Tribune Inscription identifies figures. Located in the narthex tribuneon the south side. The capital is engaged to the east pier face. The scene corresponds to the Book of Tobias (9,1-20). The young Tobias returns from a long journey, during which he met the archangel Raphael, who heals his father Tobias who became blind. (II, 10-11) This capital is the only capital in situ from the narthex tribune. vol. 21 Yonne, 237
Sainte-Marie-Madeleine Narthex King David 1 6 Narthex; tribune (in musée lapidaire c112, capital in northern tribune, first bay west) Identification on impost A short inscription is located above an arcade under which there is a person in a tower or on a wall. A modern capital is in place in the tribue represents David watching Bathsheba taking a bath. On the central face the king proclaims his affections to Bathsheba. On the right side of the capital, Uriah leaves for war on the king's orders. Listed in Lydwine Saulnier and Neil Stratford's La sculpture oubliée de Vézelay (Droz, 1984), pp 93-4. Inv. Meunier n° 34; Inv. Leboeuf n° 34. vol. 21 Yonne, 238 musee oubliee Vezelay
Sainte-Marie-Madeleine Nave Daniel in Lion's den (#34) 2 4 Commentary of scene (ca. 1131-1138) Daniel (6,16): Tunc rex praecepit et adduxerunt Danielem et miserunt eum in lacu leonum. vol. 21 Yonne, 236
Sainte-Marie-Madeleine Nave Meal of Ss. Anthony & Paul (#75) 1 8 North Aisle by door in 8th bay of nave (heading east) Not in Corpus. Representations of the Meal of Ss. Anthony and Paul have been linked to the Eucharist Not in Corpus but in Diemer's thesis.
Sainte-Marie-Madeleine Nave Temptation of St. Benedict (#31) 1 9 8th bay of nave facing south aisle. On the central face a demon menaces a female sinner. Above this part of the scene the word TIME was written. One the second part of the scene, St. Benedict blesses the sinner and her a pal of eternal happiness. Above this is painted: SPERA No trace of the inscription remains. A drawing commissioned by Barat in 1840 reproduces the words. This capital is part of the same campaign of construction as the Temptation capital in the narthex. vol. 21 Yonne, 236
Sainte-Marie-Madeleine West portal Annunciation 1 7 West portal, façade of narthex Capital now in second room of museum The angelic salutation is traditionally part of representations of the Annunciation. The text is retained in part of the liturgy: Ave Maria, gratia plena, issu de Luc (1, 28). The inscription on this capital identifies the actors in the scene. vol. 21 Yonne, 238 facade
Sainte-Marie-Madeleine West portal, façade of narthex Annunciation 1 7 West portal, façade of narthex Capital now in second room of museum The angelic salutation is traditionally part of representations of the Annunciation. The text is retained in part of the liturgy: Ave Maria, gratia plena, issu de Luc (1, 28). The inscription on this capital identifies the actors in the scene. vol. 21 Yonne, 238 facade
Saint-Germain-des-Près Choir Christ in Majesty 2 (Saint-Germain-des-Pres) 1 Capital located 1 bay west of crossing, on southwest pier. Christ in Majesty
Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand Choir donor 1 1 Inscription on two lines on a block above a decorative carving. Capital in the center of the absidiol of the southeast of the chevet The cartulary of Saint-Jean-d'Angély mentions the name of a certain Hugo Monetarius in the region of Melle several times. He is listed amongst the witnesses in six charters between 1060-1097. He was most probably a lay person because there is no mention of a clerical title. The inscription can be attributed to the 11th century. No inscription produced in this region has an O in a lozenge before the 11th century. Vol. 1 Ville de Poitiers, 66-67 Saint-Jean-d'Angely
Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand Choir donor 1 2 Inscription is very exposed and the text is today almost unreadable. Capital in the center of the second absidiol southeast chevet The cartulary of Saint-Jean-d'Angély (c. 1028-1105) cites the names of three neighbors of Aleacis —Aleardis, Aleata, Aleasis, Aleas, Aleoda, Aleaidis, Aleida—contemporaries of a certain Ugo, monedarius, and figure in the acts that concern the entire region of Melle or Saint-Jean-d'Angély. The location of this inscription near a capital inscribed with Ugo's name is similar to the cartulary. This suggests a rapport between this particular Aleacis and Ugo the monedarius. Perhaps these figures were benefactors of the college. The inscriptions probably date to the same epoch. Vol. 1 Ville de Poitiers, 67-68 Saint-Jean-d'Angely Saint-Jean-d'Angely. The
Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand Museum Discord 1 The capital's location within the church is unknown. It was found in 1837, rue des Trois-Piliers, buried in the foundations of the hôtel Cussard (today the Hôtel des Trois-Piliers). Text is inscribed on the taurus of the capital. This capital is usually called "chapiteau de la discorde". The central scene on the corbeille gives the impression of a battle between two men, facing each other, pulling on each other's beards and threatened by snakes. The left side of the corbeille, two figures, without beards, on crutches. The other side, a man armed with a snake is perched in a tree. Emile Mâle relates this capital to the Beatus Apocalypse, very similar to that of Saint-Sever, for which there was a copy at the College of Saint-Hilaire. Upon consulting the Saint-Sever manuscript, one notes that a scene at the bottom of a page is the same scene depicted on the capital. There is a capital with a similar scene found at Celle-Bruère (Chere) where the name Frotoardus is inscribed. Katzenellebogen proposed that this capital depicts the battle between Harmony and Discord (Allegories of the Virtues and Vices in Mediaeval Art, London, 1939, p.59, n.4). Vol. 1 Ville de Poitiers, 109-111 hotel Hotel Male Celle-Bruere
Saint-Nectaire Choir Transfiguration 3 1 2nd column of rond-point, north side, facing south, west and east The west angle of the corbeille shows Christ Triumphant leaning on a cross on a long pole (processional cross?). He is surrounded by Elie and Moses, each holding a banderole bearing the words of St. Peter. Inscription dates to second half of the 12th century. The Transfiguration is reported in three of the Gospels: Matt. 17, 1-9;; Mark 9, 1-8; Luke 28, 36. The text carved on this capital is closes to that in Matthew: Domine, bonum est not hic esse: si vis, faciamus his tria tabernacula, tibi unum, Moysi unum et Eliae unum. The quotation carved on this capital is truncated after tabernacula where tibi unum... would follow The identification of a person named Ranulfo remains uncertain. B. Craplet proposed that it was a donor, who through his generosity, hoped to escape a demon, depicted by the personage in the casket, similar to Notre-Dame-du-Port and followed by an angel to save him. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 236 Puy-de-Dome,
Saint-Nectaire Choir Last Judgment 5 2 2nd column of rond-point, south side, facing south, west and east Christ (near the east) holding the nails of his cross addresses the elect represented on the south face. A glorious cross escorted by angels is in the sky. The words carved on the book held by the elect and the banderoles presented by the angels are passages from Matthew 25, 34 and relate to the Last Judgment. Tunc dicet rex his qui a dextris ejus erunt: Venite, benedicti Patris mei, possidete paratum vobis regnum a constitutione mundi. Mat. 25, 41: Tunc dicet et his qui a sinistris erunt: Discedite a me, maledicti, in ignem aeternum. The sentence inscribed on the book held by John is not a biblical quotation. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 237-238 Puy-de-Dome,
Saint-Pierre Abbey South portal Virtues and Vices 4 1 South portal/ access to cloister Capital of south portal Superbia, a vice opposed to Humility, is on the east face. This face is difficult to photograph. As for Envy, which is opposite Charity, it is concealed by scaffolding installed for restoring this part of the church. The inscription can be attributed to the second quarter of the twelfth century according to art historians. vol. 15, La ville de Vienne en Dauphiné, 142-143 Dauphine,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Saint Matthew, evangelist 1 1 South gallery. 21 September + feast day Opening lines to Matt.1 The book about the generation of Jesus Christ, son of David, son of Abraham. Abraham begat Isaac. Isaac begat Jacob. (Liber g[erationis] Jhesu Christi fili[i] D[avid] fili[i] A[braham]. A[braham] g[enuit] I[saac] I[saac autem genuit Jacob]. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 140 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Babylon 2 2 South gallery; Inscription is carved above the gates See Apocalypse (14:8; 16:19; 17:5; 18:2, 10, 21) Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 140-141 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Song of Nebuchaddnezzar 5 3 South gallery; City of Babylon w/two guards is represented on the north face Daniel 4, 25-30 Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 141-142 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Martyrdom of St. Stephen 1 4 South gallery; Inscription is to the side of the tomb East face shows the saint preaching on a throne; north face shows his arrest for blasphemy by false witnesses; west shows the saint kneeling in agony; south face shows the discovery of his tomb and his translation to Jerusalem Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 142-143 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister David and his musicians 5 5 South gallery; David playing the cithara The names of several musicians established by David to sing praises to Yaweh in Jerusalem Temple are found in Scripture. However, these four names are never found together in the same passage, and the instruments attributed to these names are specific to Moissac and not Scripture. Ethan and Eman are names as descendants of Juda (1 Para., 2:6); Asaph is usually shown with a harp, lira, and symbals (I Para, 15:16-17). The rota is a medieval instrument similar to a psalterium. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 142-144 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Jerusalem 4 6 South gallery; Inscription carved on all four faces, on walls Jerusalem is called a holy city in several places in the Bible. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 144-45 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Pit of the abyss 5 7 South gallery; Chained serpent Scene from Apoc. 20: 1-3, 7 Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 145-46 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Symbols of the evangelists 4 8 South gallery; Winged man, inscription on book Opening lines to Gospel of Matthew Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 147 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister The Good Samaritan 6 9 South gallery; the traveller falls into the hands of robbers Parable of the Good Samaritan found in Luke 10: 30-35. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 148-9 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Vision of St. John 4 10 South gallery; John visited by an angel; inscription on the thimbel of the capital Text references Apoc. 1: 10. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 149 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Deliverance of Peter 4 11 South gallery; narrative is depicted on the capital's four faces. Scene of Peter appearing in court before Herod. References Acts of the Apostles 12:11. 11th verse forms the introduction to the same feast of Ss. Peter and Paul, as well as the 14th chant of vespers and lauds of the same feasts. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 150 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Samson and the Lion 3 12 East gallery; identification of depicted personnages; Angel guides Samson References Judges 14:5-7 Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 151-2 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Martyrdom of Ss. Peter and Paul 5 13 East gallery; Nero condemns the apostles to death; Inscription on face The phrase, "Saul, Saul…" is from Acts 9:4. The carved scenes depict the well-known Passion narrative for the two apostles, especially that of St. Paul, whose eyes are covered. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 152-3 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Alphabet and psalm 4 14 East gallery; floral décor The alphabet may reference the dedication ceremony, in which the alphabet is traced on the floor. However, Psalm 53 is not sung during the dedication ritual. Medieval liturgists thought that the alphabet signified the intelligence of Scripture, the letter was the same as a soul, and they contain all of knowledge. This explanation is given by Remi of Auxerre, Bruno of Asti, Honorius of Autun, Hugh of St. Victor, and articulated by Sicard of Cremona: Post haec in pavimento duo alphabeta describit [pontifex], per quae utriusque Testamenti scientiam vel sacrae scripturae intelligentiam, scilicet litteram et spiritum intellegimus. Paucae quidem litterae sunt, veruntamen in eis omnis plenitudo scientiae continebatur. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 153-4 decor Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister The Fall 3 15 East gallery; Adam and Eve before the Fall; no inscription Genesis 3: 1-25 Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 154-5 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Washing of the Feet (Mandatum) 4 16 East gallery; Christ kneeling before a basin, preparing to wash the feet of the apostle, Peter; Andrew and Paul included on this face Washing of the feet is found in John, 8:1-7. Mandatum is the term for the liturgical ceremony on Holy Thursday. The antiphon for the ceremony is: Mandatum novum do vobis, ut diligatis invicem sicut dilexi vos (John 13-34). Rupin noted that an article in the statues of Moissac (c. 1331, executed by Abbot Auger de Durfort) stipulated that on Holy Thursday, before the mandatum, 400 poor would be given bread, beans, deniers de Cahors, and sufficient wine. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 155-7 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Lazarus and Dives 8 17 East gallery; Dives is at the table while Lazarus is at the door. The dogs lick Lazarus's sores. LENT: parable constitutes the lecture of the Gospel of the Friday following the second Sunday of Lent, and the two verses of Psalm 53 forms the introduction of the Sunday following the 4th Sunday of Lent Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 157-59 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Marriage at Cana 6 19 East gallery; Site of the marriage EPIPHANY: second Sunday of the Epiphany in recommencing the verses 7-9 in particular as the refrain for the benediction and communion. The miracle at Cana is recounted in John 2:1-11. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 161-2 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Adoration of the Magi 4 20 East Gallery; Gate of Jerusalem where Herod is seated with two aides. He meets with the Magi who are leaving for Bethlehem Matthew is the only gospel that tells the story of the Adoration of the Magi (Matthew II: 1-12) Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 162-3 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Martyrdom of Fructuosus, Eulogus, and Augurus 4 21 East Gallery; Identification of represented scenes and characters Feast Day: 21 Jan. Fructuosus was the bishop of Tarragon, and Eulogus and Augurus were his deacons. They were arrested and burned alive in 259 during Valerian's persecution of Christians. The saints are not frequently venerated in France. However, Moissac had numerous possessions in the diocese of Gerona (Spain) and one of its dependencies in Toulouse was dedicated to St. Fructuosus. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 163-5 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister St. James 1 22 East Gallery; Northeast pier The feast day of St. James is December 27. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 165 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister St. John 1 23 North Gallery; North east pier The inscribed 'n' with a small o above it has been translated by Rupin as nominatus, inspired by Luke 6:13, quos et apostolos nominavit (whom he named apostles). 27 Dec. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 166 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Eagles and Fish 4 24 North Gallery; Four eagles are carved on the four corners of the capital. The inscription in carved on horizontal bracket (modillon) in the middle of each of the faces. The fish is a symbol of Christ (ictus), which formed the initials of Jesus Christ, Son of God, Savior. Christ and the apostles were fishers of men. The eagle is a symbol of resurrection. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 166-7 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Miracles of St. Benedict 4 25 North Gallery; inscription is on the impost block. South face shows a winged demon carrying a monk Capital illustrates two of St. Benedict's miracles. In one a monk is possessed by a demon and Benedict chases the demon out of the monk by beating the monk with his staff. The second miracle is at Monte Cassino, where Benedict overturned an ancient temple to Apollo and dedicated a church to St. John the Baptist in its place [find the miracles in Gregory's Dialogues]. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 167-8 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister St. Peter Heals a Paralytic 4 26 North Gallery; inscriptions illlustrates the scenes and identifies the characters. North face shows Ss. John and Peter, nimbed. The miracle is found in Acts 3:1-2. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 168-9 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Celestial Choir 4 27 North Gallery; four angles are depicted on each face. Only the archangels are named. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 169-70 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Three Hebrews in the Furnace 4 28 North Gallery; inscriptions illlustrates the scenes and identifies the characters. The furnace occupies the central part of the capital. An angel and each of the three Hebrews are shown on the angles of the capital. Their names are inscribed over their heads. Daniel 3:1-97. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 170-1 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Story of St. Martin 4 29 North Gallery; inscription is on impost block. West face shows St. Martin tearing his cloak. The inscription is on the impost block and on a medallion on the west face. The source for the inscriptions is the Vita sancti Martini by Sulpice Severus. Martin was the bishop of Tours c. 370-1, and later retired to a monastery in the Poitiers region. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 172-3 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Birds 1 32 West Gallery, 8 birds occupy the four faces of the capital. The inscription covers two faces null Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 174 null Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Daniel in the Lions' Den and the Announcement to the Sherpherds 4 33 West Gallery; inscriptions illlustrates the scenes and identifies the characters. North face shows Daniel thrown into the lions' den. Two lions appear on the corners of the capital Daniel in the Lions' den is recounted in Daniel 6:7-27. The announcement to the sherpherds is found in Luke 2:8-12. Daniel is considered a prefiguration of the Savior and the Resurrection. He is also the last of the great prophets to predict the birth of Christ (Daniel 9:24). Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 175-6 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister The Beatitudes 4 36 West Gallery; identification of a biblical scene The Beatitudes are found in Matthew 5:3-10. The order on the capital does not conform to the order found in Matthew. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 179-81 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre de Moissac Cloister Abel and Cain 4 37 West Gallery; inscriptions illlustrates the scenes and identifies the characters. West face shows Abel making an agreeable offering to Yawhee. The inscription is over the altar The narrative is found in Genesis 4: 2-9. Vol. 8 Ariège, Haute Garonne, Hautes-Pyrénées, Tarn-et-Garonne, 181-2 Ariege, Hautes-Pyrenees,
Saint-Pierre le Haut Capital on the second column of the rond-point of choir, south side Babylon Announcement to shepherds 1 1 Archaeologists typically date the capitals at Chauvigny to the 12th century. The epigraphic evidence does not contradict this dating, but suggests that the date is in the first half of the century. Capital height = 1.05m The text for Announcement to the Shepherds comes from Luke 2:14: Gloria in altissimis Deo (2:14) and Pax in caelo et gloria in excelsis (19:38). The text inscribed here comes directly from the liturgy, [Gloria in excelsis Deo et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis. The inscriptions referring to Babylon can perhaps be related to two passages from Apocalypse: Babylon magna, mater fornicationum et abominationum terrae (Rev. 17:5), and: Salus et gloria et virtus Deo nostro... qui judicavit de meretrice magna, quae corrupit terram in prostitutione sua (Rev. 19:2). The south face of this capital illustrates the Weighing of Souls and cites Scripture. Vol. 2 Poitou-Charentes and Département de la Vienne (excepté la ville de Poitiers), 25-26 Departement (excepte
Saint-Pierre le Haut Choir Babylon Announcement to shepherds 3 1 Archaeologists typically date the capitals at Chauvigny to the 12th century. The epigraphic evidence does not contradict this dating, but suggests that the date is in the first half of the century. Capital height = 1.05m The text for Announcement to the Shepherds comes from Luke 2:14: Gloria in altissimis Deo (2:14) and Pax in caelo et gloria in excelsis (19:38). The text inscribed here comes directly from the liturgy, [Gloria in excelsis Deo et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis. The inscriptions referring to Babylon can perhaps be related to two passages from Apocalypse: Babylon magna, mater fornicationum et abominationum terrae (Rev. 17:5), and: Salus et gloria et virtus Deo nostro... qui judicavit de meretrice magna, quae corrupit terram in prostitutione sua (Rev. 19:2). The south face of this capital illustrates the Weighing of Souls and cites Scripture. Vol. 2 Poitou-Charentes and Département de la Vienne (excepté la ville de Poitiers), 25-26 Departement (excepte
Saint-Pierre le Haut Choir Annunciation 3 2 Inscription on three faces of capital at fourth column of the rond-point of choir, south side. Capital height: 1,05m. Inscriptions are carved onto the face of the capital and around the Virgin's halo. Inscription on Virgin's nimbus. Confusion probablement commise par le graveur sur la face ouest du chapiteau. Le terme auta fait penser à la salutation ave, parfaitement conforme à la scène représentée sur la face sud du même chapiteau. Il est possible que le graveur ait d'une part interverti les deux textes et, d'autre part, mélangé les mots sancta et ave. On a l'impression qu'il a commencé à graver les deux premières lettres de la salutation de l'ange (AV) et terminé par les deux dernières lettres de sancta (TA). Le texte prononcé par l'ange de l'Annonciation est, d'après Luc 1:42: "Ave gratia plena, Dominus tecum". La forme "Ave Maria gratia plena" vient de la liturgie: alleluia et offertoire du 25 mars (et autres offices de la Vierge). Vol. 2 Poitou-Charentes and Département de la Vienne (excepté la ville de Poitiers), 25-26 a scene representee meme melange commence premieres termine dernieres prononce d'apres Departement (excepte
Saint-Pierre le Haut Choir Alphabet 1 3 Exterior arm of the south transept; intrados of the archivolt above the second window There are several instances of alphabets carved in church walls. These alphabets have sometimes been related to the church dedication ceremony, but due to the location of these carved alphabets, it is difficult to assume this relationship. Vol. 2 Poitou-Charentes and Département de la Vienne (excepté la ville de Poitiers), 26 Departement (excepte
Saint-Pons-de-Thomières Cloister The Maries and the Angel at the Tomb 1 (Saint-Pons-de-Thomieres) 1 Now in the Musée du Louvre Visitatio Sepulchri. Fig. 160b in Evans, Cluniac Art of the Romanesque Period. Musee
Saint-Porchaire West Portal Daniel 1 2 Capital to right The theme of Daniel in the lion's den is one of the oldest in Christian iconography. In the region, it is found on a capital in the church of Marestay. Inscription dates to second half 2nd century (ca. 1068). Vol. 1 Ville de Poitiers, 93
Saint-Porchaire West Portal Lions 1 1 West portal of church, north capital Approx. 200cm from ground, letters 3.7 cm high Lions appear frequently in western Romanesque art. Many meanings are attributed to them. They may be used as a deocrative motif, a symbol of evil, used by God to triumph for the Good, or to represent Good, courage, or Christ. The portal and the bell tower were constructed shortly after Saint-Porchaire was attached to the abbey of Bourgeueil (1068). Paleographic investigation sets the inscription to this date. Vol. 1 Ville de Poitiers, 92
Saint-Priest Choir Virtues 4 1 Four figures on each face representing the four virtues. The names are found on a faux-tailloir. fourth column south of rond-point, towards the west Dates to 12th century The four Virtues represented on this have been erroneously interpreted by Mâle, and fixed by Bréhier, who saw taht the martyr, St. Priest and personnifications of his virtues. Dates to 12h century. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 248 Male, Brehier, Puy-de-Dome,
Saint-Priest Choir Evangelists 4 2 On each face an angel holds a phylactère (banderole). northest capital of rond-point Like at Brioude, Mozac, and Notre-Dame-du-Port (Clermont-Ferrand), the evangelists are represented by angels. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 247 phylactere Puy-de-Dome,
Saint-Priest Choir Donation of Guillaume de Bezac 3 3 Hemicycle, capital on the second column south, parting from the west. On the left angle of the east face, the donor offers a Volvic priest a column symbolizing the church, whose altar is surmounted by a chalice representing the architecture. On the west face, two angels with wings, carry a standard. The angel on the left guards the sanctuary owed to Guillaume. The toponymy "Bezac" is not found in the Auvergne. The only commune of the same name is found in the Ariège. Saint Priest was massacred in 674 in his own home, the same place where Avit founded the first monastery. Guillaume de Bezac is not known apart from this inscription. Based on iconography, the donation is not limited to the capital, but includes a large part of the Romanesque sanctuary. The inscription suggests a twelfth-century date, most probably after the first third, based on the Romanesque form used for the donor name. vol. 18, Allier, Cantal, Loire, Haute-Loire, Puy-de-Dôme, 246 Ariege. Puy-de-Dome,
Saint-Quentin-de-Baron Choir Singing 1 1 Capital is on north wall at the entrance to the choir, above a pier, 3.3m from the pavement Person holding a book. The signs after cantta resemble the drawing of certain neumes. The words debe, debe corresponds to musical notes. It may relate to scales of music. A manuscript from Montpelier (c. 11the century) uses these latin alphabet characters to translate the differences between notes. According to the Montpelier system, the inscription can signify: sing: ré, mi, si, mi, ré, mi, si, mi. Vol. 5 Dordogne, Gironde, 124-125 re,
Saint-Révérien Choir Paradise and Hell 3 (Saint-Reverien) 1 Capital on the second column of ambulatory, on the south side, approx. 5 m off the ground. Weighing of the souls This capital represents the central theme of the Weighing of Souls. The structure represented on the capital refers to the Heavenly Jerusalem, which is frequently represented as a fortified structure. Dates to first part of the twelfth century. vol. 19, Jura, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, 46 Nievre, Saone-et-Loire,
Saint-Sardos Nave Daniel 1 1 west side, south wall No figure The traditional interpretation views this work as a Temptation and sees the inscription as an artist signature. However, a better hypothessis proposed by M. Henri Renou, a photothécaire at C.E.S.C.M., and taken up by M. Pierre Dubourg-Noves suggests that the inscription designates the prophet Daniel. In fact, the figure to the left holds a ball and throws tar pellets of fat and hair to the dragon, puncturing the dragon. This iconography is found without an inscription in the crypts from Hagetmau, to Mas-d'Agenais, and perhaps the western portal at Saint-Vincent-de-Pertignas, according to Mll. A.-M. Labit à Saint-Pierre-de-Quittimont. Dates to 12th cent. vol. 6, Gers, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, 137 photothecaire a Pyrenees-Atlantiques,
Saint-Savinien Choir mayor and wife honorific 3 1 Capital is on a pier separating the nave (left bay) just before the crypt and choir. Capital 2.13 m above ground. Letters are approx. 6 cm high=2.3 in. These two people are mentioned in the text of the chronicle, thus dating the construction of the capital ca. 1070-1080. vol. 21 Yonne, 211
Saint-Trophime Cloister Resurrection of Lazarus 2 1 North Gallery. Capital of pier that precedes the northwest angle. 2m from ground. Letters between 0.7-1cm. Dates to second half of 12th century. There are also plaques in the cloister: Resurrection, St. James, an apostle, St. Stephen, and Gamaliel. Lazare is in the vocative case, forming the beginning of the quote: Lazare, veni foras (John 11,43). vol. 14, Alpes-Maritime, Bouches-du-Rhône, Var, 46-47 Bouches-du-Rhone,
Saint-Trophime Cloister Sacrifice of Isaac 1 2 North gallery. Third column from the northwest corner. Letters approx. 1 cm. high. Dates to second half of 12th century. The Sacrifice of Isaac (Genesis 22, 9-14). vol. 14, Alpes-Maritime, Bouches-du-Rhône, Var, 47 Bouches-du-Rhone,
Saint-Trophime Cloister Balaam 1 3 North gallery. Third column from the west. 2.2m from ground. Epigraphic field = 6.7 cm. Height of letters = 0.7 cm Dates to second half of 12th century. The iconographic source for this capital is found in Numbers, in which the story of Balaam is recounted (Numbers 22-24). On the face seen here, a camp of Israelites, symbolized by two rows of heads, create a fortification. vol. 14, Alpes-Maritime, Bouches-du-Rhône, Var, 48 Bouches-du-Rhone,
Saint-Trophime Cloister Abraham in the forest of Mambré 0 4 North gallery. First column from the east. 2.3m. From ground. Height of letters = 0.7 cm. Dates to second half of 12th century. The Meeting of Abraham (Gen. 18, 1-15). On another face Abraham is shown serving a young calf to his guests. vol. 14, Alpes-Maritime, Bouches-du-Rhône, Var, 48-49 Bouches-du-Rhone,
Saint-Trophime Cloister Moses receives the Law 1 5 North gallery. Third pier from the east. 2.1 m from ground. Letters = 1cm. Dates to second half of 12th century. This scene shows the tablets with the Law Moses received from Yahweh at Mount Sinai (Exodus 34, 1-29). pg. 49
Saint-Yrieix-le-Déjalat Choir Temptation of Christ 1 (Saint-Yrieix-le-Dejalat) 1 Placed on the south side of the church (near the old cemetary). The capital, no longer in situ, and it now under the socle of a cross. La scène représente la Tentation du Christ au désert. Le démon que désignent les mot temtator Dei apporte au Christ une pierre qu'il va lui demander de changer en pain. L'inscription intervient comme une légende de la scène, mais ne constitue pas une citation textuelle, contrairement à ce que l'on a rencontré à l'église de Beaulieu-sur-Dordogne. Inscription is dated to 11th century. Vol. 4 (II), Limousin: Corrèze, Creuse, Haute-Vienne, 54-55 scene represente desert. demon designent legende scene, a rencontre l'eglise Correze,
Santa Maria de Lebanza Crossing The three Marys at the Tomb. 3 1 Left side: gardener with a hoe. Main side: two Marys and an angel facing the tomb. Inscriptions on the abacus and on the tomb. Right side: third Mary. Inscription on the abacus. Now in the William Hayes Fogg Art Museum. Cahn, Walter et Linda Seidel (1979). Romanesque Sculpture in American Collections. New England Museums, Vol. I, New York : Burt Franklin & co, p. 205-210. null null
Santa Maria de Lebanza Crossing Christ in majesty. 3 2 Left side: two figures holding the Patriarchal Cross. Main side: Christ in majesty in a mandorla, surrounded by the four evangelists: an angel, an eagle, an ox and a lion. The angel and the eagle show the wounds of Christ (as the Redeemer). Right side: two figures hold the spear and the nails respectively. Now in the William Hayes Fogg Art Museum. Cahn, Walter et Linda Seidel (1979). Romanesque Sculpture in American Collections. New England Museums, Vol. I, New York : Burt Franklin & co, p. 205-210. Capital from the Abbey of Santa María de Lebanza. Harvard Art Museums, https://harvardartmuseums.org/collections/object/231792?position=0. null Maria null
Sorde-L'Abbaye Choir Betrayal of Judas and Arrest of Christ 2 1 North capital of north absidiole Inscription is on the tailloirs. Dates to beginning of 12th century The iconography of this capital reports the betrayal of Judash and Christ's arrest in the Garden of Olives, as told int he four gospels (Mt. 26, 47-56; Mark 14, 43-50; Luke, 22, 47-53; John 18, 2-12). vol. 6, Gers, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, 105 Pyrenees-Atlantiques,
Sorde-L'Abbaye Choir/ Daniel in the Lion's Den 1 2 Capital at the entrance to the north absidiole, south side, north tailloir Figure of Daniel at the center with a lion on each side filling the corners of the face. The episode represented here is the story of Daniel in the Lions' Den (Daniel 6, 11-25). vol. 6, Gers, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, 106 Pyrenees-Atlantiques,
Unknown Unknown Mary and Martha at the resurrection of Lazarus 2 1 Left side: damaged. Part of the body of Lazarus can be seen with a sarcophagus. Main side: two draped female figures facing Lazarus, identified by the inscriptions as Mary and Martha. Now in the Cleveland Museum of Art. Cahn, Walter et al. (1999). Romanesque sculpture in American collections. New York and New Jersey, Middle and South Atlantic States, the Midwest, Western and Pacific States, Vol. II, Turnhout : Brepols, p. 156-157. null null
Usson-Du-Poitou West Portal Lion? Animal? 1 1 Animal. Inscription dates to 12th century Capital to the left of western portal The text is inspired by Sophonias 3, 14: Lauda, filia Sion; jubila, Israel; laetare, et exulta in omni corde, filia Jerusalem). The text is an exhortation to penance and probably is an introit to the mass on the fourth Sunday of Lent, Laetare: Laetare, Jerusalem et conventum facite, omnes qui diligitis eam. The image of the lion is frequently viewed as a representation of the Resurrection. Vol. 2 Poitou-Charentes and Département de la Vienne (excepté la ville de Poitiers), 143 Departement (excepte
Vigeois Choir St. Peter 1 1 Capital in the north arm of the transept, to the right of the entrance. The inscription is engraved into the interior of the mandorla. The key is an attribute of the apostle Peter. Alcuin composed an inscription for Saint-Vaast d'Arras at the end of the 8th century using the word claviger: Claviger ethereus servat qui regimina caeli. Vol. 4 (II), Limousin: Corrèze, Creuse, Haute-Vienne, 67 Correze,
Vilhosc Crypt Dedication 1 1 Crypt, north side, next to last capital. Capital is 35 x 29 cm. Height of 'E' in dedicacio = 3cm. Dates to second half of the eleventh century. The formula for consecrated altars is well known for this period. The use of the term dedicacio for an altar consecration is not unusual. The most common nouns are consecratio, or consecrare sacrare, however a third of the cases use the words Dedicatio, dedicare or DICARE. Saint-Gervais de Vilhosc was an Augustinian priory. Guy Barruol dates the inscription to the second part of the eleventh century. vol. 16, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Hautes-Alpes, Ardèche, Drôme, 25 Ardeche, Drome,